HMS Pennywort

Vessel Name on Arrival: 
HMS Pennywort
Vessel Type: 
Corvette
GRT: 
950
Draught For'd: 
8' 0"
Draught Aft: 
8' 0"
Year Built: 
1942
Arrival Date: 
24/01/1949
Breakup Started: 
08/02/1949
Date First Beaching: 
18/03/1949
Original Builder: 
A & J Inglis Limited of Pointhouse, Glasgow + Kincaid
Original Yard No.: 
1087p
Other Information: 

Flower-Class Corvette PENNYWORT                                  Pennant No. K 111
 
(Design based on the Christian Salvesen whale- catcher S.S. SOUTHERN PRIDE.  This Corvette differed from most of the others built as she was fitted out with an 'Acoustic Hammer', as well as mine-sweeping gear.  The 'acoustic hammer' was a device for exploding mines.)
 
12-12-1939  :  Ordered
11-03-1941  :  Laid Down
18-10-1941  :  Launched
05-03-1942  :  Commissioned
 
Length  :  62.6 mts  x  10.1 mts.                Displacement  :  950 / 1,160 tons
 
Propulsion  :  Single shaft/screw driven by a 4-Cylinder Triple Expansion Steam Reciprocating Engine
Boilers  :  Two single-emded cylindrical Boilers
Speed  :  16 knots
 
HMS PENNYWORT'S WAR CAREER
HMS did not distinguish her war career by the sinking U-Boats or enemy surface ships, that was not her role. Her principal role was convoy escort duties and the saving of survivors.
 
18-03-1943
Picked up 30 survivors from the American merchantman JAMES OGLETHORPE, which had been torpedoed by the German submarine U-758 in the North Atlantic.  The American vessel, with 30 men still on board, attempted to make St Johns, Canada, but was never heard of again.  She also picked up a further 40 survivors from the torpedoed Norwegian freighter ELIN K, which was sunk by the German submarine U-603 on the previous day.
 
18-03-1943
In company with HMS ANENOME, picked up a total of 54 survivors from British cargo/passenger liner CANADIAN STAR, which had been torpedoed by the German submarine U-221, in a position South-East of Cape Farewell.
 
25-08-1944
In a position North-West of Cap d'Antifer, along with HMS DAMSAY, picked up a total of 59 survivors from the British merchant vessel ORMINSTER, of the South American Saint Line, which had been torpedoed by the German submarine U-480 in the English Channel.  The freighter had been returning to the UK from the Normandy beaches.
 
 

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